Artist Interview: Megan Buccere

We are pleased to present "Oil & Dust", the debut mini solo exhibition of new works by Megan Buccere this March at the gallery. This new series will showcase this exciting artist with small works in the medium of (oil) paint and pastel (dust). We asked Megan a few questions about the exhibition specifically and about her artistic process in general. 

ME: What was your inspiration for this show and how did you select your subject matter?

MB: My inspiration for Oil and Dust came after i suffered crippling anxiety and depression due to a medical oversight.  


ME: How are these works different in terms of style and application than previous works?

MB: This series is a bit different from my previous works in that I really tried to put myself into my work.  I'm usually standing back trying to narrate a visual performance of sorts but in this case I was the narrative I was the work. I tried to be the viewer with me on my journey into and eventually out of depression and anxiety.


ME: What is the significance of the strings and hands in your work? Is there any underlying symbolism there?

MB: From remembrance to seeking knowledge, I have put a lot of pressure on the little strings in my work over the years.  In this series,however, the strings have taken on a different meaning. They show an oppression of the mind and body. By being tied down and hampered by a mental illness the subject isn't allowed to become their true self. The multiple hands in some of the pieces reinforce this by giving the strings more to adhere to.


ME: Do you have a favorite piece in the show, or one that was particularly challenging to work on, and why?

MB: It's difficult to choose a favorite piece from the show but I would say that "a Prayer to the Void" (detail, below) speaks loudest to me.  It encompasses the feel I wanted to convey for the show very directly and without apology.  


ME: What artists inspire you (living or deceased)?

MB: I've been a high school art teacher for the past 15 years so I teach about art history and inspiration almost every day. I would have to say that my students inspire me more than any other historical artist. They are young and full of vibrancy. They want to learn and to teach at the same time. I really have to give them a lot of credit when it comes to my work. I sometimes bring my show pieces to class and let my upper levels critique them. You haven't felt true inspiration or self doubt until high school students have given your art a good once over. The are simply the best.


ME: What’s your daily life like? What are some things you do when you’re not painting / making art?

MB: My daily life is art.  As I said I've taught advance high school art for 15 years in a very small community.  I also have a wonderful husband who is also a teacher and a 7 year old vivacious and creative little boy. 

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The opening reception for ‘Oil & Dust’ will be held at Modern Eden Gallery on Friday March 4, 2016 from 6 pm–9 pm. The artist will be in attendance at the reception. The exhibition will be on display through March 26, 2016 and is free and open to the public. More info HERE>

 




Kim Larson
Kim Larson

Author

Kim Larson is the Gallery Director and Co-Owner at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco's historic North Beach neighborhood. Opened in June 2010, the gallery features monthly exhibitions of established and emerging artists. The gallery's contemporary aesthetic ranges from realism to surrealism with a strong focus on illustrative painting and representational sculpture. She is a pround member of the San Francisco Art Dealers Association and the current Director of North Beach First Fridays. Her passion for art started at a young age and continues today with her private art collection. www.moderneden.com