Familiar

Julia deVille

    • Taxidermy Raven, Sterling Silver, Black Rhodium, Amethyst, Glass 
    • 95 x 40 x 45 cm. | 37 x 16 x 18 in. 
    • © 2016
    • Hanging Sculpture
  • Raven is my familiar. Fluxing in my blood Feminine is dusk and darkness, the moon, the womb… My atramentous Raven Animistic amulet. Evolve through fundamental fractals. Wind me up,Watch my metempsychosis unfurl. 

    The work of New Zealand-born Melbourne-based multidisciplinary artist Julia deVille rarely fails to turn heads. Her interest in life and death permeates every facet of her jewelry and taxidermy-based practice, manifesting itself in hauntingly beautiful sculptures that incorporate deceased animals and jewelry featuring recurring deathly motifs, including skulls, claws, and bones.

    Key to deVille’s unique and daring aesthetic is a fascination with the concept of mortality as expressed through the Memento Mori (objects serving as a warning or reminder of death) of the 16th to 18th Centuries, as well as the methods of adornment used to sentimentalize death during the Victorian era.   

    “The nature of our culture is to obsess over planning the future, however in doing so, we forget to enjoy the present,” says deVille.

    “As a society we spend most of our time thinking about the past or projecting into the future. The only moment that actually holds any value is this moment. I use symbols of mortality in my work as an anchor into the present, a reminder of the importance of life.” - BLOUINARTINFO

  • This piece will be available for pickup after the closing of the exhibition on October 8, 2016. Any shipping costs will be invoiced separately at the time of shipment for this piece.

    Worldwide shipping and payment plans are available. If interested, please email Gallery Director Kim Larson at kim@moderneden.com for our rates, policies and procedures.

    If you have any questions, feel free to contact us any time via email (info@moderneden.com) or by phone (415) 956-3303 during regular business hours. Thank you!

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